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Messages - cadence4u

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16
Off-Topic / Re: Movies
« on: August 30, 2020, 11:19:54 am »Message ID: 1337461
Not here!

They are use county fair grounds for drivin movies & concerts!

17
Off-Topic / Surge in Americans buying tiny $30K pop-up backyard offices as people move to wo
« on: August 27, 2020, 10:31:18 am »Message ID: 1337164
Surge in Americans buying tiny $30K pop-up backyard offices as people move to working remotely during the coronavirus pandemic

* Prefabricated backyard offices have become the newest trend for Americans working at home during the pandemic
* Studio Shed, based in Colorado, sells small home offices and other spaces for an average of $20,000 to $30,000
* Similar backyard offices have been seen in California, Pennsylvania, Colorado and other states
* Several areas do not require permits for home add-ons under 200sqft, making the pop-up backyard offices more
   accessible for the millions of Americans working from home during the pandemic

Americans are now paying up to $30,000 to install a pop-up home offices in their backyards as a number of people continue to work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The outbreak of the coronavirus in January and implementation of lockdown orders in March shuffled millions of citizens from bustling offices to working remotely in their homes.     

The move proved difficult for several people as many families were forced to balance a multitude of factors, including child care, as the search for a private, quiet work space led many to temporarily claim bedrooms or basements. 

Some home-sellers have tried to entice buyers by saying their residence 'provides a nice backdrop for Zoom calls'.

But as industries have increasingly pushed employees to work from home, some have found success with professionally made, stand-alone backyard offices.

According to Studio Shed, a Colorado-based company that builds prefabricated backyard structures, business in recent months has boomed exponentially.

'Recently, we have seen a massive surge in the 80- to 120-square feet option, which is a perfect office size or home gym or kid’s study area,' Mike Koeing, Studio Shed co-founder, told Yahoo Finance.

Studio Shed has been constructing tiny offices, bedrooms, music studios, 'man caves' and other spaces that cost an average of $20,000 to $30,000 since 2008.

Studios can be designed online with a 3D design tool or delivered as a kit with instructions. They can include options for interior design, insulation and electricity.

Koeing said the shift from independent offices to working remotely caused sales to spike 14-fold compared to what the company made last year.

'We were already seeing some very good growth having started in 2008 just seeing these shifts in the way people work and wanting to spend more time at home and maybe not commute, but starting in March it’s just been growing significantly,' said Keoing.

Most of the demand for Studio Shed's home offices have primarily come from the West Coast, but Koeing said they've noticed a significant increase of customers on the East Coast.

'As soon as March and April hit we definitely saw that Eastern part of the country grow, that market is up a couple hundred percent over last year,' said Koeing.

March and April coincides the two-month span where New York City emerged as a virus epicenter and was inundated with thousands of cases.

Much of America watched as New York City's morgues overflowed, hospitals became overrun, front line workers pleaded for PPE supplies on social media and one of the most buzzing cities went quiet.

Nearby states like New Jersey were also hit and temporarily shuttered as a result.

As of August, New York City has amassed more than 238,000 cases and 23,000 deaths. New York State recorded 436,000 cases and 32,000 deaths.

Depending on where the shed is built, many places do not require permits for add-on dwellings under 200sqft, which further pushed the emerging trend's popularity.

Koeing told CNN Business that Studio Shed sold five times as many home office units in May, June and July compared to the same months last year.  It's on pace to sell 10 times more units this month that August 2019.

Other companies like Modeco Construction in Canada, a prefabricated building company, and Bantam Built, a tiny house company, have also seen a surge in sales.

Sheds Unlimited, based in Pennsylvania, serves customers from South Carolina to Maine and the spike in requests has pushed delivery time to up to 13 weeks.
The company traditionally made storage sheds and garages, bud administrator Janelle Stoltzfus said they've seen a number of sheds being repurposed as office space.

'We have had a lot of people looking for home offices,' said Janelle Stoltzfus. 'They've asked us to install shelves so they have a place to work.'

Erin Miller, a layout designer and copy editor for Centennial Colorado, told CNN Business that having to share an office space with her husband while working from home became difficult.

'Let's just say that our styles are not 100% the same,' said Miller.

Subsequently, Miller ordered a 10-by-16 foot shed in May and it was fully finished by early July.

The shed doesn't require a permit where she lives and was able to complete the project in a few weeks.

'We did need to permit the electrical but that was quite manageable, requiring only two inspections,' said Miller.

Miller's pop-up shed has room for a desk, an extra table, printer, file cabinet, a bookcase and an additional 80sqft of room.

'That will probably be outfitted with a sofa, chair and rug, to allow me to also use the space during non-work hours to read, relax or visit with friends,' she said.

Although the new space has attracted the attention of Miller's teenage children, she said the prefabricated space provided a much-needed haven.

'My commute to work is a bit longer,' she said. 'Out the back door and across the grass instead of just down a flight of stairs, but the space is welcoming.'

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8670191/Surge-Americans-buying-tiny-30K-pop-backyard-offices.html

18
Off-Topic / More than one million Americans filed for unemployment last week even as parts o
« on: August 27, 2020, 10:22:29 am »Message ID: 1337163
More than one million Americans filed for unemployment last week even as parts of the economy start to rebound amid the pandemic and government financial aid dries up

* Initial claims for state unemployment benefits totaled 1.006 million for the week ended August 22, compared to 1.104
   million in the prior week
* The reopening of businesses in May helped to pull down claims from a record 6.867 million in March, when nonessential
   were shut due to coronavirus
* Before the coronavirus pandemic, claims had never topped 700,000 in a week
* More than 14.5m are collecting traditional jobless benefits, up from 1.7m in 2019

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits hovered around one million last week, suggesting the labor market recovery was stalling amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and government financial aid drying up.

Initial claims for state unemployment benefits totaled a seasonally adjusted 1.006 million for the week ended August 22, compared to 1.104 million in the prior week, the Labor Department said on Thursday.

The reopening of businesses in May helped to pull down claims from a record 6.867 million in March, when nonessential establishments were shuttered in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Claims dropped below 1 million early this month for the first time since the pandemic started in the United States. Before the coronavirus pandemic, they had never topped 700,000 in a week.

More than 14.5 million are collecting traditional jobless benefits - up from 1.7 million a year ago - a sign that many American families are depending on unemployment checks to keep them afloat. 

The pandemic has had a devastating impact on the American economy. Businesses closed and Americans stayed home to avoid infection. Economic activity plummeted and employers slashed more than 22 million jobs in March and April.

Since then, the job market and the economy have been rebounding as businesses slowly reopened.

Home sales and prices have been strong. Employers added nearly 9.3 million jobs in May, June and July - but that hiring surge replaced just 42 per cent of the jobs lost in March and April.

Until July 31, the unemployed were receiving an extra $600 a week in federal money on top of regular state unemployment benefits, part of an extraordinary lifeline extended to help them through the crisis.

The loss of that money is putting the squeeze on many families.

'My income is basically cut in half,' said Taylor Love, 34, an unemployed massage therapist in Austin, Texas. 'Paying our mortgage is going to be a struggle. We´re going to have to dip into what little savings we have.´

After passing a massive financial rescue package in March, congressional Republicans and Democrats have been unable to agree on more aid.

President Donald Trump signed an executive order August 8 offering a stripped-down version of the expanded unemployment benefits.

At least 39 states have accepted or said that they would apply for federal grants that let them increase weekly benefits by $300 or $400.

A summertime resurgence of cases in the South and West forced many businesses to close again in July. The data firm Womply reports that business closures have mostly stabilized in the past four weeks.

Still, 70 per cent of Texas bars and 71 per cent of California health and beauty shops were closed as of mid-August, Womply found.

Economists also worry that without additional government help the economy's recovery will fade.

'I really want Congress to come up with a benefits package,' said Jacob Hanson, an unemployed temp worker in Seattle. 'Everyone needs a hand right now. The situation is pretty ridiculous.'

Businesses have exhausted government loans to help with wages, while a weekly unemployment supplement expired in July. Economists attributed a sharp rebound in activity to the government's financial support and some are dialing back lofty growth estimates for the third quarter. 

Last week, nearly 608,000 people applied for jobless aid under a new program that extends eligibility for the first time to self-employed and gig workers, up from 525,000 the previous week.

That figure isn't adjusted for seasonal trends, so it's reported separately.

Altogether, the Labor Department said that 27 million people are receiving some form of unemployment benefits, though the figure may be inflated by double-counting by states.

Though new COVID-19 infections have subsided after a broad resurgence through the summer, many hot spots remain, especially at college campuses that have reopened for in-person learning.

A separate report from the Commerce Department on Thursday confirmed the economy suffered its deepest contraction in at least 73 years in the second quarter.

Gross domestic product plunged at a 31.7 per cent annualized rate last quarter, the government said in its second estimate. That was revised from the 32.9 per cent pace reported last month.

The economy slipped into recession in February.

Rubeela Farooqi, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics,  said: 'The risk of permanent damage to the labor market remains high which will slow the pace of recovery. The return to pre-pandemic levels of prosperity is set to be an uncertain and prolonged process.'


19
Off-Topic / Hurricane Laura kills three in Louisiana including girl, 14, when trees fall on
« on: August 27, 2020, 10:14:07 am »Message ID: 1337162
Hurricane Laura kills three in Louisiana including girl, 14, when trees fall on their homes amid 150mph winds as 700,000 are left without power - and those who didn't evacuate are told 'write down your name and keep it in a ziplock bag in your pocket'

* Hurricane Laura made landfall in southwest Louisiana as an 'extremely dangerous' Category 4 hurricane
* It came ashore near the small town of Cameron and wreaked havoc in Lake Charles in early hours of Thursday
* According to Louisiana Gov Bel Edwards, a 14-year-old girl was killed when a tree fell on her home 
* More than 700,000 homes and businesses are without power in Texas and Louisiana as of Thursday morning
* Louisiana officials said in statement that rescue efforts cannot and will not begin until after hurricane passes
* 'Please evacuate and if you choose to stay and we can't get to you, write your name, address, social security number
    and next of kin and put it a ziplock bag in your pocket,' the statement reads
*  Laura's 150mph winds made it the strongest hurricane to strike the US this year and in Louisiana since 1856 
* The storm surge could penetrate inland from between Freeport, Texas, and the mouth of the Mississippi River
* Officials in TX and LA issued mandatory evacuation orders for more than half a million people on Tuesday


Hurricane Laura has killed three people, including a 14-year-old girl, after trees fell on their homes when the Category 4 storm system smashed into Texas and Louisiana with 150mph winds, leaving 700,000 without power as people who did not evacuate are told to write their names on a piece of paper and 'put it in a ziplock bag' in their pockets. 

The hurricane made landfall at 1am with the strongest winds that Louisiana has seen since 1856 and warnings that the storm could rip apart buildings and penetrate up to 200 miles inland.

The hurricane's first reported fatality was a 14-year-old girl in Leesville, Louisiana, who died when a tree fell on her house, a spokeswoman for Governor John Bel Edwards said.

'We do expect that there could be more fatalities,' the spokeswoman, Christina Stephens, said on Twitter.

Just hours later, two more fatalities were reported in Louisiana. One 60-year-old man was killed when a tree fell on his home. Another man died when a tree fell on his home in Jackson Parish.

Gov Edwards also warned Louisiana residents to stay inside until the threat of the storm is completely over.

'Now is not the time to go sightseeing. The threat #Laura poses to Louisiana is far from over,' Edwards tweeted Thursday morning. 'Stay home, continue to heed warnings from local officials and monitor your local news to stay informed,' he added.

Laura reached land near the small town of Cameron around 30 miles from the Texas border, where officials went door-to-door pleading with people to flee the path of the storm amid fears the entire parish will be inundated.

In a statement, the Vermilion Parish Sheriff's Office in Louisiana warned that anyone choosing not to evacuate 'must understand that rescue efforts cannot and will not begin until after storm and surge has passed and it is safe to do so'. 

'Please evacuate and if you choose to stay and we can't get to you, write your name, address, social security number and next of kin and put it a ziplock bag in your pocket. Praying that it does not come to this!' the sheriff's office said.

The Beauregard Parish Sheriff's Office said in a statement they are 'experiencing very high call volume at this time and understand the dire situation the parish is currently in'.

The sheriff's office is asking residents to 'limit calls to things or situations of the highest level of emergency'.

Footage showed torrents of rain flying sideways past street lights in Lake Charles, and streets covered with water closer to the coast, while glass fell from shattered windows and parts of a casino roof were torn away.

The windows of the city's 22-floor Capital One Tower were blown out, street signs were toppled and pieces of wooden fence and debris from collapsed buildings lay scattered in the flooded streets, video footage on Twitter and Snapchat showed.

Louisiana Gov Edwards tweeted Thursday morning that a massive chemical fire has broken out at a plant in Lake Charles.

'There is a chemical fire in the Westlake/Moss Bluff/Sulphur area. Residents are advised to shelter in place until further notice and close your doors and windows,' Edwards tweeted.

'If you are in the Westlake/Moss Bluff/Sulphur area, shelter in place, close your windows and doors and Turn Off Your  Air Conditioning Units. There is a chemical fire. Stay inside and wait for additional direction from local officials,' he added.

Video footage on Twitter showed thick black smoke billowing into the sky over the wind-torn landscape near Interstate 10.

The Westlake police are still investigating the incident a representative said by phone, and authorities were blocking traffic on the interstate and Highway 90 in the meantime.

Hurricane Laura is now pushing inland while the Gulf Coast faces storm surges and 10 inches of rain coupled with a high tide, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) says - while tornadoes could form at the edges of the weather system.

Its center was moving north, about 20 miles north of Fort Polk, Louisiana. Damaging winds extended outward as far as 175 miles. The hurricane is predicted to become a tropical storm later in the day.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) warned that high water levels would persist along the Gulf Coast for several hours as Laura moved north and then northeast.

Texas officials lifted evacuation orders at 11am but they are urging residents who evacuated to allow them more time to assess roadways and clear debris.

'There are several areas throughout our region who have no power at this time. Electrical crews need first priority. It is dangerous to drive on the roadways that have not been cleared. Downed power lines with live wires, downed trees and other random debris could cause you to get injured,' an update from Jefferson County's Office of Emergency Management reads.

The city of Galveston has also lifted its evacuation order. Officials said the city 'did not sustain wind or storm damage, and water is receding in low-lying areas that experienced street flooding'.

Houston also reported being spared from much of the impact of Hurricane Laura.

The Louisiana National Guard shared images of guardsmen working to clear roadways and assess damages from Hurricane Laura in Lake Charles.

Despite the hurricane weakening, Ken Graham, the director of the National Hurricane Center, warned that Laura is expected to remain a hurricane until it nearly reaches Arkansas.

'We expect Hurricane Laura to still be a hurricane even when you get up to Shreveport, right on the Arkansas border,' Graham told CNN.

White House officials said President Donald Trump will visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) later today to be briefed on Hurricane Laura.

In a press statement, the White House said: 'As we begin to assess the damage, please continue to heed the warnings and instructions of your state and local officials as storm hazards will persist long after the storm has passed.

'Trump is committed to deploying the full resources of the Federal Government to rescue those in distress, support those in the region affected, and restore disruptions to our communities and infrastructure,' the statement reads.

More than 700,000 homes and businesses were without power in Texas and Louisiana, as near-constant lightning provided the only light for some and debris flew into windshields and an RV toppled over in torrential rain. According to poweroutage.us, more than 138,000 are without power in Texas and 570,000 in Louisiana.

Officials said some stragglers were pleading for help after earlier refusing to evacuate - but 'there ain't no way to get them'.

In Cameron Parish, where Laura came ashore, Nungesser said 50 to 150 people refused pleas to leave and planned to endure the storm, some in elevated homes and even recreational vehicles. The result could be deadly.

'It's a very sad situation,' said Ashley Buller, assistant director of emergency preparedness. 'We did everything we could to encourage them to leave.'

Drawing energy from the warm Gulf of Mexico, the system arrived in 'full beast mode' as the most powerful hurricane to strike the US so far this year and its effects are expected to be felt in Texas, Mississippi and Arkansas.

With hours of violent weather ahead, officials said the extent of destruction likely wouldn't be clear until daybreak, when search and rescue missions will begin.

Hurricane Laura blew parts of the Golden Nugget Casino's roof as it tore through the city of Lake Charles on Thursday.

Texas Gov Greg Abbott said major evacuations along coastal Texas ahead of Hurricane Laura 'no doubt saved lives'.

'The early reports are that there were no deaths,' Abbot said told CNN. 'One reason for that is because people did heed the warnings to evacuate.'

At 150mph, the hurricane's winds were the strongest to make landfall in Louisiana since the Last Island Hurricane of 1856, said meteorologist Philip Klotzbach of Colorado State University.

Hurricane Katrina came in at 125mph, although the 2005 storm which caused up to 1,800 deaths and $125billion  of damage was worse when measured by pressure.

The winds took Laura close to the threshold of a Category 5 storm, the highest on the Saffir-Simpson scale and defined as sustained winds of 157mph or more.

'This is one of the strongest storms to impact that section of coastline,' said David Roth, a forecaster with the National Weather Service (NWS).

The NWS continued: 'We worry about that storm surge going so far inland there because it's basically all marshland north to Interstate 10. There is little to stop the water.'

'It felt like we were experiencing an earthquake with dozens of aftershocks,' said CNN correspondent Gary Tuchman on the ground in Lake Charles, a city of 80,000 people.

'It sounded like a combination of a Boeing 747 going down a runway and a freight train going down the track - it was so loud for hours.'

There were gusts of 137mph in downtown Lake Charles and 127mph in Cameron, a WWLTV meteorologist said, with 95pmh winds in the Lacassine wildlife refuge and 73mph in Port Arthur, Texas.

Torrential rain was also lashing Baton Rouge while flash floods were expected to continue in Alexandria, Opelousas and Pineville into the morning. 

NBC reporter Jay Gray was nearly knocked over by the wind this morning as he told Good Morning Britain viewers that 'the intensity of this early band from this storm is as strong as any that I've seen in recent memory,' before the broadcast was cut off for his safety.

The storm grew nearly 87 per cent in power in just 24 hours to a size the National Hurricane Center called 'extremely dangerous', making it the powerful hurricane to strike the US so far this year.

'It looks like it's in full beast mode, which is not what you want to see if you're in its way, University of Miami hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy said.

The storm surge could penetrate inland from between Freeport, Texas, and the mouth of the Mississippi River, and could raise water levels as high as 20 feet in parts of Cameron Parish, the NHC said.

Rescuers warned that floodwater may be contaminated with sewage or contain dangerous insects or animals. 

'Some areas, when they wake up Thursday morning, they're not going to believe what happened,' said Stacy Stewart, a senior hurricane specialist.

'What doesn't get blown down by the wind could easily get knocked down by the rising ocean waters pushing well inland.'

People were today urged to take cover in a 'reinforced interior room away from windows', ideally 'under a table or other piece of sturdy furniture', to shield themselves from the 'life-threatening conditions'.

'To think that there would be a wall of water over two stories high coming on shore is very difficult for most to conceive, but that is what is going to happen,' said NWS meteorologist Benjamin Schott at a news conference. 

'The word 'unsurvivable' is not one that we like to use, and it's one that I've never used before,' Schott said of the storm surge.

The National Weather Service in Lake Charles warned that some communities will be 'uninhabitable for weeks or months'.

Forecasters also warned hurricane-level winds could also blow as far as 200 miles inland to Shreveport, Louisiana, with hurricane warnings in place from San Luis Pass, Texas, to Intracostal City, Louisiana. 

The center of Laura is forecast to move over northwestern Louisiana Thursday, across Arkansas Thursday night, and over the mid-Mississippi Valley on Friday.

After that, the storm will move eastwards with threats of flash flooding in the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers and the mid-Atlantic states on Friday and Saturday. 

Ocean water topped by white-capped waves began rising ominously as the monster neared land on Wednesday afternoon.

In the largest US evacuation since the pandemic began, more than half a million people were ordered Tuesday to flee from an area of the Gulf Coast along the Texas-Louisiana state line.

More than 420,000 residents were told to evacuate the Texas cities of Beaumont, Galveston and Port Arthur.

Another 200,000 were ordered to leave the low-lying Calcasieu and Cameron parishes in southwestern Louisiana, where forecasters said as much as 13 feet of storm surge topped by waves could submerge whole communities.

Flash flood watches were issued for much of Arkansas, and forecasters said heavy rainfall could move to parts of Missouri, Tennessee and Kentucky late Friday and Saturday.

Forecasters in Little Rock, Arkansas said the remnants of the hurricane could bring up to six inches of rain and flash flooding affecting homes and businesses.

Strong winds are also expected to affect Mississippi until Thursday evening while the tornado warnings also cover parts of the state. 

Laura's arrival comes just days before the August 29 anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which breached the levees in New Orleans, flattened much of the Mississippi coast and killed as many as 1,800 people in 2005.

Laura also imperiled a center of the US energy industry. The government said 84 per cent of Gulf oil production and an estimated 61 per cent of natural gas production were shut down. Nearly 300 platforms have been evacuated.

When Hurricane Harvey struck in 2017 there were oil and chemical spills, along with heavy air pollution from petrochemical plants and refineries.

While oil prices often spike before a major storm as production slows, consumers are unlikely to see big price changes because the pandemic has already decimated demand for fuel.

Laura passed Cuba and Hispaniola, where it killed nearly two dozen people, including 20 in Haiti and three in the Dominican Republic.

The deaths reportedly included a 10-year-old girl whose home was hit by a tree and a mother and young son crushed by a collapsing wall.

The Atlantic storm season, which runs through November, could be one of the busiest ever this year, with the NHC predicting as many as 25 named storms. Laura is the 12th so far.

Photos:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8668663/Hurricane-Laura-continues-gain-strength-Category-5-storm-making-landfall.html

20
Off-Topic / Re: Garden
« on: August 27, 2020, 09:56:15 am »Message ID: 1337158
In Southern California, we get very little rain.

Have you put a cover over your garden so it won't get drench from the rain?

21
Off-Topic / Donald Trump pardons female suffrage leader Susan B. Anthony who was convicted o
« on: August 18, 2020, 08:02:51 am »Message ID: 1336419
Donald Trump pardons female suffrage leader Susan B. Anthony who was convicted of illegally voting to mark 100th anniversary of 19th amendment giving women right to vote

* President Donald Trump said Tuesday he will pardon Susan B. Anthony, a leader in the women´s suffrage movement
* She was arrested for illegally voting in 1872 when only men could vote
* Trump had teased a big pardon was coming
* Anthony's pardon comes on the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote
* Anthony died in 1906 - 14 years before the amendment was ratified so she was never able to legally vote in the
   United States

President Donald Trump said Tuesday he will pardon Susan B. Anthony, a leader in the movement that gave women the right to vote, who was arrested for voting in 1872 at a time when only men were allowed to do so.

'Later today, I will be signing a full and complete pardon for Susan B Anthony. She was never pardoned,' he said at a White House ceremony celebrating the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, which gave women the right to vote. It´s also known as the Susan B. Anthony Amendment.

'She got a bargain for a lot of other women, and she didn't put her name on the list. So she was never pardoned for voting,' Trump said.

The president had teased on Monday he would pardon someone 'very, very important' the following day but would not say who it was - other than to rule out former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn and Edward Snowden.

His move comes as voting rights have become a central issue in the 2020 election.

Delays in mail delivery led the U.S. Postal Service to warn all 50 states that some mail-in ballots may not arrive in time to be counted. Democrats have voiced concerns about voter disenfranchisement while President Trump has criticized mail-in voting as leading to election fraud despite numerous studies that state that is not the case.

Trump's pardon also comes as Republicans have expressed concern the party is losing support of women voters, citing the low marks women gave President Trump for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic and race relations.

Anthony was arrested for voting in her hometown of Rochester, New York, in 1872 and convicted in a widely publicized trial of voting when only men were allowed that right. She refused to pay the $100 fine but authorities declined to take further action.

She is long known for her work in the women's rights movement but she also supported the anti-alcohol temperance movement and fought for the freedom of slaves.

Her name has been co-oped by conservatives for the Susan B. Anthony foundation, a group that supports pro-life lawmakers.

Marjorie Dannenfelser, President of Susan B. Anthony List, was at Tuesday's event at the White House.

But there is dispute among scholars and historians at to Anthony's position on abortion and it's difficult to ascertain it given it was a not a huge public issue during her time as a political activist.

In 1869, Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association as part of their battle to secure a woman's right to vote.

Anthony gave as many as 100 speeches a year and traveled to numerous states to push for an amendment to be added to the constitution. 

She died on March 13, 1906, before the 19th amendment was ratified.

The 19th Amendment states that 'The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.'

Congress passed it in 1919, and the amendment was ratified on Aug. 18, 1920.

In honor of her work, the U.S. Treasury Department put Anthony's portrait on dollar coins in 1979, making her the first woman to be so honored.

But visiting Anthony´s grave site in Rochester on Election Day has become a popular ritual in recent years.

Thousands turned out in 2016 for the presidential match-up between Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Clinton paid tribute to Anthony on Tuesday.

'The ratification of the 19th Amendment was both an enormous victory & an incomplete one,' she wrote on Twitter. '100 years on, I'm thinking of my mom, who was born the day of its passage in Congress. If she were still with us, she'd urge us to keep going—'lifting as we climb.''

In 2016 and 2018, voters showed up by the dozens to put their 'I Voted' stickers on her headstone.

The Life and Activism of Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony was born on February 15, 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts, the daughter of Quakers.

She had seven brothers and sisters, many of whom became activists for justice and emancipation of slaves, a cause she herself supported.

She worked as a teacher for many years and became an abolitionist after meeting William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass, who were friends of her father's.

In 1848, a group of women held a convention at Seneca Falls, New York. It was the first Women's Rights Convention in the United States and began the Suffrage movement.

Anthony did not attend although her mother and sister did.

It was in 1849, Anthony became more involved social issues, including the temperance movement, aimed at limiting or completely stopping the production and sale of alcohol.

In 1851, Anthony met Elizabeth Cady Stanton at an anti-slavery conference and the two women formed a partnership that saw them spend the next 50 years fighting for women's rights.

In 1868, when Congress passed the 14th and 15th amendments which give voting rights to African American men, Anthony and Stanton were angry that women were not included.

They formed the National Woman Suffrage Association, to push for a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote.

Anthony was arrested in 1872 for voting illegally in her hometown of Rochester – a time when only men had the right to do so. She was fined $100 for her crime.

In 1876, she led a protest at the 1876 Centennial of our nation's independence. She gave a speech—'Declaration of Rights' - written by Stanton and another suffragist, Matilda Joslyn Gage.

'Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less,' she said.

In 1888, she became president of the National American Women's Suffrage Association and led the group until 1900.

In 1905, she met with President Theodore Roosevelt in Washington, D.C., to lobby for an amendment to give women the right to vote.

Anthony died in 1906, 14 years before women were given the right to vote with the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920.

The U.S. Treasury Department put Anthony's portrait on dollar coins in 1979, making her the first woman to be so honored.


22
Off-Topic / EXCLUSIVE: 'Joe Biden stole Jill from me': Her first husband tells how she CHEAT
« on: August 17, 2020, 10:18:23 am »Message ID: 1336328
EXCLUSIVE: 'Joe Biden stole Jill from me': Her first husband tells how she CHEATED with Democrat candidate he once considered a friend and that they have LIED about how they started dating for years

* Joe Biden and his wife Jill  had an affair that broke up her first marriage, her ex-husband told DailyMail.com in an
   exclusive interview
* Bill Stevenson says that their story about how the presidential candidate fell in love with Jill after a blind date is made
   up
* The way the Bidens tell their story, Joe saw a picture of Jill in March 1975 — after her marriage crashed — and they
   went on a date and have been together since
*But Stevenson claims he and his then wife met Biden in 1972, when they worked on then-New Castle County
  Councilman Biden's first campaign for the Senate
* At the time Biden was married to his first wife Neilia who died with their daughter Naomi in a car crash between the
   election and Biden taking his Senate seat
* 'Jill and I sat in the Bidens' kitchen,' Stevenson said. 'We worked on his campaign'
* Stevenson said he first suspected Biden and Jill were having an affair in August 1974; He was then 26, Jill was 23 and
  Joe was 31
* 'One of her best friends told me she thought Joe and Jill were getting a little too close,' he said
* That October he got confirmation when a man informed him Biden was driving his wife's car and the two of them got
   into a fender bender 
* Stevenson said: 'I asked Jill to leave the house, which she did... I considered Joe a friend. I'm not surprised he fell in
   love with Jill'

Joe Biden and his wife Jill have lied to the world for more than 40 years about how they started dating — they actually had an affair that broke up her first marriage, her first husband claims.

And the whole story the Bidens tell about how the presidential candidate fell in love with Jill after a blind date is completely made up, Bill Stevenson told DailyMail.com in an exclusive interview.

Now Stevenson is about to publish a book that he says will blow the lid off the sham story.

'I don't want to hurt anyone,' Stevenson, 72, said at his home in Wilmington, Delaware, the town Biden has called home for half a century. 'But facts are facts and what happened, happened.'

Stevenson is keeping the title of his book close to his chest.

He said he has not yet decided whether to publish before the election or after. 'It's ready to go,' he said. 'They can print 30,000 copies in 10 days.

'I genuinely don't want to harm Jill's chances of becoming First Lady. She would make an excellent First Lady — but this is my story.

'It's not a bitter book — I'm not bitter because, if it wasn't for my divorce, I would never have met my wife Linda and she's the greatest thing in my life — but it does have facts in it that aren't pleasant to Jill and Joe.

'People ask me how I can go back 40 years, but I am not, I'm going back 72 years to tell my life story,' added Stevenson, who founded The Stone Balloon, a famed live music club near the University of Delaware.

Rolling Stone once called it 'the best kept secret in rock and roll.' Some of the biggest names in music including the Allman Brothers, Metallica, Ray Charles, Run DMC, The Dave Matthews Band, David Crosby, Bonnie Raitt and Hootie and the Blowfish played there during its 30-plus year history.

'The book is about 300 pages long and Jill only takes up about 80 of them,' Stevenson said.

Stevenson married Jill Jacobs in 1970. 'It was February, I believe it was the 7th,' he told DailyMail.com.

Two years later, he said, the couple were working on then-New Castle County Councilman Biden's first campaign for the Senate.

At the time Biden was married to his first wife Neilia who died along with their one-year-old daughter Naomi in a car crash between the election and Biden taking his Senate seat.

'Jill and I sat in the Bidens' kitchen,' said Stevenson, who describes himself as a liberal Republican, although he says he voted for Barack Obama and Biden in both 2008 and 2012. 'We worked on his campaign.

'I gave $10,900 to his first campaign — in cash.'

Stevenson — who appeared with Biden on Delaware Today's 2012 list of the 50 most influential people from the state — said he had originally wanted to work for sitting Republican Senator Caleb Boggs, who was expected to win re-election easily.

'But I had a disagreement with Boggs over corruption in Delaware and he told me: 'Get out of my office. Go work for that joke Biden,' who was then at only about 20 percent in the polls.'

Biden eventually eked out victory by just over 3,000 votes — 1.4 percent — running a campaign juxtaposing his youth and energy with 63-year-old Boggs, who admitted he didn't want to run for a third term and only did so because President Richard Nixon pleaded with him.

Biden, just 29 on election day, became the sixth-youngest US Senator in history.

Stevenson said he first suspected Biden and Jill were having an affair in August 1974. He was then 26, Jill was 23 and Joe was 31.

'I know exactly when it was,' he said. 'Bruce Springsteen was going to play at The Stone Balloon and I had to go to Northern New Jersey to pay him in advance.

'I asked Jill to go with me and she said no — she had things to do, she had to look after Joe's kids, Beau and Hunter. It was kind of a big deal to go meet Springsteen. I had no idea she and Joe were that kind of friendly.

'Then one of her best friends told me she thought Joe and Jill were getting a little too close. I was surprised that she came to me.'

That October he got confirmation. 'I was at work and a guy came in and asked: 'Do you own a brown Corvette?' I said yes, it's my wife's car.

'He said back in May it had crunched his bumper and they told him to get an estimate and he never heard back from them.

'I said: 'Wait a minute. Who is they?' And he said: 'Funnily enough, Senator Biden was driving.'

That was it as far as Stevenson was concerned.

'I asked Jill to leave the house, which she did. Her father was begging me to take her back when he found out what was going on. He asked me to give her a second chance, but I wasn't interested.

'I considered Joe a friend. I'm not surprised he fell in love with Jill. Everyone who meets Jill falls in love with her immediately. It's hard not to.'

But the way the Bidens tell their love story, Joe saw a picture of Jill in March 1975 — after her marriage had crashed.

She was in an advertisement for local parks that he saw while passing through Wilmington Airport with his brother Frank. He told Frank that was the kind of girl he would like to date and Frank said: 'Why don't you then? I know her,' and passed on her number.

In her 2019 autobiography Where The Light Enters, Jill wrote that Joe called her and asked her out. She said she already had a date, but he persisted because he was only in town for one night and she relented.

They went to Philadelphia to see the French movie, A Man And A Woman, ironically about a widowed man falling in love, and then went out to dinner.

Despite him saying he was only in town for a single night, the couple went out the next two nights as well, she wrote.

The New York Times told a slightly different story. It said he didn't know his date was the 'drop-dead gorgeous' woman he had been admiring earlier until he picked her up.

Jill and Joe Biden married at the Chapel of The United Nations in New York in June 1977.

Stevenson first met Jill in August 1969. 'I was leaving for Woodstock the following day,' he said. I was at a car wash and she and her friend came over to admire my 1968 Z28 Chevy Camaro. It was yellow with black stripes, all the rage at the time.

'I was going to my friend's birthday party that night, so I invited them along. There were four good looking girls in that apartment and I thought the more the merrier. The rest is history.'

They married the following year when Jill was only 18. In her book, she described her first husband as 'charismatic and entrepreneurial,' – but did not name him. She said her marriage soon fell apart.

'We were young, and it didn't take long before we grew in different directions,' she wrote.

'I tried to make the relationship work. I thought I could will our marriage back to life. But I had to separate what I thought my family should be from the reality of what this relationship was.

'Before long, I began to see that the breaks were beyond repair,' she added. I wouldn't settle for a counterfeit love. Like a broken spell, the truth of the reality struck me suddenly: I was going to get divorced.'

Stevenson has led a colorful life. He played defensive end for the University of Delaware football team before opening The Stone Balloon.

He was at Studio 54 in New York with Andy Warhol and Lisa Minnelli and met some of the biggest names in rock through his club. He is a multiple gold medal winner at shot put in the National Senior Games.

He also founded a horticultural company called Sticky Pots and invented the SuperStake, a plant support system that he recently sold to Scotts Miracle-Gro. 'They sold a million SuperStakes in Walmart alone last year,' he said.

He hit the headlines himself when he had a heart attack on the streets of Manhattan in 2018. He died for six minutes before he was brought back to life by NYPD officers, ABC News reported.

Since then he has led a campaign to get defibrillators into police cars throughout the country.

'I'd already started the book,' he said. 'I came back from the dead to finish it.'

This isn't the first book that Stevenson has written. He authored a book of the early years of The Stone Balloon, which is now sold on Amazon for an astonishing $395.

'You'll never see that in the $1.99 bin at Barnes & Noble like you see Joe Biden's books,' he quipped.

The Biden campaign did not immediately respond to DailyMail.com's request for comment.

23
Off-Topic / Re: Have you noticed . . .
« on: August 17, 2020, 10:05:40 am »Message ID: 1336326
If you don't want children ever again, please remove your tubes so you can't get pregnant!

24
Off-Topic / Re: A good lesson !!
« on: August 17, 2020, 10:00:22 am »Message ID: 1336325
Never share your wifi password to your neighbors! They might add more to your internet/cable account!

25
Off-Topic / President Trump's Younger Brother Robert Died
« on: August 16, 2020, 11:36:38 am »Message ID: 1336223
President Trump's Younger Brother Robert Died

President pays tribute to his younger brother who has died at age 71: Robert Trump passes away after 'suffering brain bleeds from a recent fall' - just one day after hospital visit from Donald

* Robert Trump, 71, died in hospital Saturday after being visited by the president on Friday afternoon
* Donald Trump, 74, paid tribute to his brother, calling him his 'best friend' and saying: 'Robert, I love you'
* Robert had been admitted to hospital in New York City after reportedly suffering a fall
* He was described as 'very ill' and is believed to have had a brain bleed which left him unable to speak
* Robert was previously hospitalized in June for ten days at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City
* The youngest of the five Trump siblings, Robert was described as low-key, charming and loyal
* He did not come under the pressure that his elder siblings did from their father to join the family business
* Robert initially worked on Wall Street but later joined the Trump Organization, although never at the center
* Eric Trump has paid tribute to his uncle: 'an incredible man' who was 'strong, kind and loyal to the core'

Donald Trump's brother Robert, 71, has died just one day after the president visited him in hospital in New York.

The president said in a statement on Saturday night: 'It is with heavy heart I share that my wonderful brother, Robert, peacefully passed away tonight.

'He was not just my brother, he was my best friend. He will be greatly missed, but we will meet again. His memory will live on in my heart forever. Robert, I love you. Rest in peace.'

Robert, who reportedly took blood thinners, had suffered recent brain bleeds that began after a recent fall, according to a close friend of the family, who spoke to The New York Times.

Over the past few weeks, he had not been able to speak on the phone, according to the family friend.

Rudy Giuliani, the president's lawyer, was among the first to pay tribute to Robert. 

'Robert Trump has a big heart,' he tweeted. 'As a former Mayor I know how much he did to help New Yorkers in need.

'We have lost a really good man. My love, prayers and condolences to the #Trump family.'

Eric Trump then tweeted fond memories of his uncle, describing him as 'an incredible man' who was 'strong, kind and loyal to the core.'

Ivanka Trump followed with a tribute on Twitter on Saturday night saying: 'Uncle Robert, we love you. You are in our hearts and prayers, always.'

Donald Trump Jr tweeted Sunday morning: 'Uncle Rob, we love you and we will miss you. RIP.'

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden shared his condolences Sunday morning in a tweet addressed to Donald Trump saying 'Jill and I are sad to learn of your younger brother Robert's passing'.

'I know the tremendous pain of losing a loved one — and I know how important family is in moments like these. I hope you know that our prayers are with you all,' Biden added.

Robert Trump had no children, but he helped raise Christopher Hollister Trump-Retchin, the son of his first wife, Blaine Trump.

Besides the president, he is survived by his second wife, Ann Marie Pallan, and his sisters, Maryanne Trump Barry and Elizabeth Trump Grau.

His brother Fred Trump Jr. died in 1981.

Robert's death came one day after the president visited him in hospital in New York City, where he was said to be suffering from a serious condition.

Trump had been scheduled to travel to his country club in nearby Bedminster, New Jersey for the weekend, but made a stop in Manhattan first to check in on his sibling.

The president was seen leaving the heliport after flying in from New Jersey.

Hospital security guards were seen blocking off access to a street outside the medical center ahead of the president's visit earlier this afternoon.   

Trump was wearing a protective face mask as he arrived at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center in Lennox Hill late Friday afternoon.

Robert had been admitted to the hospital and was described as 'very ill', however details of his illness are still not officially confirmed.

During a White House press briefing after his visit to his brother's bedside, the president said his brother was 'having a hard time' but did not elaborate on why he had been hospitalized.

Robert, the youngest of the five Trump siblings, was previously hospitalized for ten days at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York in June.

He was admitted to the neurosciences intensive care unit where he was treated for a 'serious condition', the Daily Beast reported.

Around the same time, Robert had filed a lawsuit against his niece Mary Trump, seeking to block her from publishing a tell-all book on the president.

Mary is the daughter of the brothers' eldest sibling, Fred Trump Jr, who struggled with alcoholism and died in 1981 at the age of 43.

Robert filed for an injunction claiming the explosive book, 'Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man', violated the terms of a confidentiality agreement she signed nearly two decades ago.

In a statement to The New York Times in June, he accused his niece of attempting to 'sensationalize and mischaracterize' their family relationship for her own financial gain.

'I and the rest of my entire family are so proud of my wonderful brother, the president, and feel that Mary's actions are truly a disgrace,' Robert said.

The explosive memoir was eventually released last month after a judge agreed to lift a temporary restraining order preventing Mary from publicizing or distributing her work.

The judge said the confidentiality clauses in the 2001 agreement, 'viewed in the context of the current Trump family circumstances in 2020, would offend public policy as a prior restraint on protected speech'.

The younger Trump had openly voiced his support for his brother over the years.

In an interview with Page Six ahead of the 2016 presidential election, Robert said he supported his brother's campaign '1,000 per cent'.'

He was later seen celebrating Donald's victory at the New York Hilton where the then president-elect delivered his acceptance speech.

Robert also spoke out in support of his brother during a brief, but rare interview at LAX airport last December, when Trump had been at the center of an impeachment trial.

When asked how his older sibling was doing, he told the cameraman: 'I think he's doing fantastic,' before getting into the his car.

Robert had also held a senior position in the family business, but unlike his brother, he has generally maintained a low public profile.

He previously served as an executive for Trump Organization where he managed the real estate portfolio outside of Manhattan.

In 2016 Robert told Page Six that he was 'gainfully retired'.

He was married to socialite Blaine Trump for 25 years until their 2007 divorce, and until his death served on the board of directors of ZeniMax Media.

The couple's split was widely reported in the tabloids following reports that Robert had been living with his mistress - and now wife - for two years.

Prior to his death, he was based in Long Island where he lived with wife Ann Marie Pallan, his former secretary, who he reportedly married in March.

Despite their split, Robert was said to have remained on good terms with his ex-wife, who reportedly attended Trump's inauguration in 2017. 

Robert also has two older sisters.

Elizabeth Trump Grau, 78, is a retired executive from Chase Manhattan Bank, and Maryanne Trump Barry, 83, is a retired federal judge. 

As the youngest of the five Trump siblings, Robert was shielded from the pressures placed on the eldest, Fred Jr, and then Donald.

He was never groomed to take over the family real estate company, and was considered by those who knew him to be the inverse of the brash, self-promotional brother who eventually did.

After graduating from Boston University, he first went to work on Wall Street, instead of immediately joining the family business.

But he eventually went to work for his brother as a senior executive at the Trump Organization.

'You could consider him the quietest of Trumps,' said Michael D'Antonio, a Trump biographer.

'He was glad to stay out of the spotlight.'

Jack O'Donnell, a former Trump Organization executive who worked closely with the Trump family, told the New York Times that Robert was someone with a natural ease and good humor that his older brother lacked.

'He was dignified, he was quiet, he listened, he was good to work with,' O'Donnell said.

'He had zero sense of entitlement. Robert was very comfortable being Donald Trump's brother and not being like him.'

The pair were not always close.

In 1990, a year after Trump had put Robert in charge of the opening of the Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Trump furiously attacked Robert over problems with the slot machines.

People who knew him said Robert was devastated by the fight with Trump, and the rift between them took years to heal, the New York Times said.

He reconciled with his brother when Trump decided to run for president, according to a person close to the family.

The soft-spoken, easygoing brother who backed the president until the end: Robert Trump shunned the spotlight in later life until he threw his support behind Donald and protected the family when he sued niece Mary over tell-all book
President Donald's younger brother, Robert Trump, a businessman known for an even keel that seemed almost incompatible with the family name, died Saturday night at the age of 71.

The youngest of the Trump siblings had remained close to the 74-year-old president and, as recently as June, filed a lawsuit on behalf of the Trump family that unsuccessfully sought to stop publication of a tell-all book by the president's niece, Mary. 

Robert Stewart Trump was born in 1948, the youngest of New York City real estate developer Fred Trump's five children.

The president, more than two years older than Robert, admittedly bullied his brother in their younger years, even as he praised his loyalty and laid-back demeanor.

'I think it must be hard to have me for a brother but he's never said anything about it and we're very close,' Donald Trump wrote in his 1987 bestseller 'The Art of the Deal.'

'Robert gets along with almost everyone,' he added, 'which is great for me since I sometimes have to be the bad guy.'

Both longtime businessmen, Robert and Donald had strikingly different personalities.

Donald Trump once described his younger brother as 'much quieter and easygoing than I am,' and 'the only guy in my life whom I ever call "honey."'

Robert began his career on Wall Street working in corporate finance but later joined the family business, managing real estate holdings as a top executive in the Trump Organization.

'When he worked in the Trump Organization, he was known as the nice Trump,' Gwenda Blair, a Trump family biographer said. 'Robert was the one people would try to get to intervene if there was a problem.'

In the 1980s, Donald Trump tapped Robert Trump to oversee an Atlantic City casino project, calling him the perfect fit for the job.

When it cannibalized his other casinos, though, 'he pointed the finger of blame at Robert,' said Blair, author of 'The Trumps: Three Generations that Built an Empire.'

'When the slot machines jammed the opening weekend at the Taj Mahal, he very specifically and furiously denounced Robert, and Robert walked out and never worked for his brother again,' Blair said.

People who knew him said Robert was devastated by the fight with his brother, and the rift between them took years to heal, the New York Times said.

He reconciled with his brother when Donald decided to run for president, according to a person close to the family.

A Boston University graduate, Robert Trump later managed the Brooklyn portion of father Fred Trump's real estate empire, which was eventually sold.

Once a regular boldface name in Manhattan's social pages, Robert Trump had kept a lower profile in recent years. 'He was not a newsmaker,' Blair said.

He was married to socialite Blaine Trump for 25 years until their 2007 divorce and was active on Manhattan's Upper East Side charity circuit.

The couple's split was widely reported in the tabloids following reports that Robert had been living with his mistress - and now wife - for two years. 

In early March of 2020, he married his longtime girlfriend, Ann Marie Pallan, and they lived together in Long Island.

Despite their split, Robert was said to have remained on good terms with his ex-wife, who reportedly attended Trump's inauguration in 2017.

In 2016 Robert told Page Six that he was 'gainfully retired'.

He avoided the limelight during his elder brother's presidency, having retired to the Hudson Valley. But he described himself as a big supporter of the White House run in a 2016 interview with the New York Post.

'I support Donald one thousand percent,' Robert Trump said.

He was later seen celebrating Donald's victory at the New York Hilton where the then president-elect delivered his acceptance speech.

Robert also spoke out in support of his brother during a brief, but rare interview at LAX airport last December, when Trump had been at the center of an impeachment trial.

When asked how his older sibling was doing, he told the cameraman: 'I think he's doing fantastic', before getting into the his car.

Robert Trump had no children, but he helped raise Christopher Hollister Trump-Retchin, the son of his first wife.

The eldest Trump sibling and Mary's father, Fred Trump Jr., struggled with alcoholism and died in 1981 at the age of 43. 

The president's surviving siblings include Elizabeth Trump Grau and Maryanne Trump Barry, a retired federal appeals judge.

Authors Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher described Robert Trump as soft spoken but cerebral in 'Trump Revealed: The Definitive Biography of the 45th President': 'He lacked Donald´s charismatic showmanship, and he was happy to leave the bravado to his brother, but he could show flashes of Trump temper.' 

Donald Trump statement on Robert's death
'It is with heavy heart I share that my wonderful brother, Robert, peacefully passed away tonight.

'He was not just my brother, he was my best friend. He will be greatly missed, but we will meet again. His memory will live on in my heart forever.

'Robert, I love you. Rest in peace.'

Photos
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8631955/Donald-Trumps-brother-dies-New-York-hospital-one-day-visit-president.html













26
Off-Topic / Re: Allergic to Rice
« on: August 16, 2020, 11:16:26 am »Message ID: 1336222
I found out a few years ago that I am allergic to rice. My allergy Dr asked me if I ate a lot of Chinese food and I said I enjoyed eating it from time to time. I love rice especially Jasmine rice and I'm disappointed that I'm allergic. I eat it still sometimes and itch. But I try to stay away from it as well. If I eat it , it's just a moderate amount.
In grocery stores in Rice section - cauliflower, broccolli & sweet potato that is riced! You should tried it!

27
Off-Topic / Re: "Kamala" Harris dead
« on: August 16, 2020, 11:13:46 am »Message ID: 1336221
Good for her! Rest in Peace VP Kamala Harris!

28
Off-Topic / Re: Biden picks VP
« on: August 14, 2020, 10:20:14 am »Message ID: 1335984
Biden mad a wrong choice! Kamala Harris has not done

Harris raised about $39 million for her presidential bid in 2019, including transfers from her Senate campaign account, while spending about $40 million, the FEC filings show. She suspended her campaign in December, amid declining poll numbers and fundraising, with some of her vendors ending up with unpaid bills.

In every single office Kamala Harris has held in San Francisco & statewide, Kamala Harris Failed Californians!

Kamala Harris is NOT eligible to be VP because her parents were immigrants

Kamala Harris does Not like Joe Biden! They are always yelling at each other!

Charmed actress Rose McGowan criticized Kamala Harris yesterday for accepting donations from Harvey Weinstein in one of her past campaigns. 'Did you return the money Weinstein gave you? @SenKamalaHarris How many predators bankroll you?,' she asked in a retweet comment from Jeffrey St. Clair, the editor of CounterPunch.





Do you think this will increase the voting in favor of our standing President, because it's not enough just to not vote for Biden/Harris, they have to back the administration in office now.

They will go to TRUMP!

29
Off-Topic / Re: Biden picks VP
« on: August 13, 2020, 01:35:16 pm »Message ID: 1335911
Biden mad a wrong choice! Kamala Harris has not done

Harris raised about $39 million for her presidential bid in 2019, including transfers from her Senate campaign account, while spending about $40 million, the FEC filings show. She suspended her campaign in December, amid declining poll numbers and fundraising, with some of her vendors ending up with unpaid bills.

In every single office Kamala Harris has held in San Francisco & statewide, Kamala Harris Failed Californians!

Kamala Harris is NOT eligible to be VP because her parents were immigrants

Kamala Harris does Not like Joe Biden! They are always yelling at each other!

Charmed actress Rose McGowan criticized Kamala Harris yesterday for accepting donations from Harvey Weinstein in one of her past campaigns. 'Did you return the money Weinstein gave you? @SenKamalaHarris How many predators bankroll you?,' she asked in a retweet comment from Jeffrey St. Clair, the editor of CounterPunch.


30
Off-Topic / Re: Lake Lanier
« on: August 12, 2020, 09:59:40 am »Message ID: 1335763
Why is it spooky? What makes it "haunted"? People die in swimming and boating accidents everywhere. Naya Rivera drowned in a lake in California. Is that lake haunted now too? I don't get it.  ???

No Naya died at that lake in Georgia. Where you get your information from? She was on the boat with her son. They didn't find her body right away it took weeks. Read lake lanier history.

No lake in Georgia where she was drowned!

Naya Rivera did drowned in Lake Piru in Ventura County, California!
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/13/entertainment/naya-rivera-search-body-found/index.html

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