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Topic: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda  (Read 5478 times)

walksalone11

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Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« on: May 23, 2012, 10:27:53 am »
"Contrary to popular belief, especially among non-Natives, American Indians did not simply relinquish their rights to lands, waters, and other natural resources. Indeed, as a result of historic negotiations and treaties between the U.S. government and tribal nations, federal agencies are obligated to provide specific rights, services, and protections as payment for the basic wholesale exchange of the land mass of the United States.

Misnomer—the use of a wrong or unsuitable term to describe something.

The United States contractually owes tribal nations. “Indian benefits” is a misnomer for the debt owed to Native peoples. The federal government pledged through laws and treaties to compensate for land exchanges accomplished through the forced removal of tribal nations from their original homelands. Unfortunately, payment is commonly expressed as “benefits.” This term—benefits—implies giving assistance, subsidy, or even charity, rather than deserved reimbursement. The Department of Interior even describes the obligated recompense for American Indians as benefits on its webpage.

On the same website, Indian Affairs describes their programs as part of the “unique and continuing relationship with and responsibility to tribes and Indian people.” Words like “support,” “assist,” and “serve” are used in the description of the nature of the relationship between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian people. That is, the purpose of Indian Affairs is to help us develop our “tribal governments, strong economies, and quality programs.” Within this context, the federal government and its Indian policies are benevolent—for the good of Indians and tribes.

Even the payment bartered keeps changing—and not for the good of Indians and tribes. In 2004, a U.S. Commission for Human Rights report found that the conditions in Indian country are at a crisis point due to chronic underfunding by the federal government. This same report contends that the mismanagement of funds by the BIA in 2000 resulted in a $7.4 billion dollar deficit in unmet needs for Indian country—a third of that in child welfare services. Not one of the six federal agencies responsible for the major expenditures in Indian country received a positive review from the Commission, i.e. the Department of Interior, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, Department of Justice, Department of Education, and Department of Agriculture.

In any other world, this would constitute default, or perhaps, breach of contract. Instead, the lack of payment by the federal government to the sovereign tribal nations translates into necessary budget cuts and decreased social welfare spending.

Propaganda—communication dispersed widely to influence personal and societal attitudes.

Even worse, tribal citizens endure the stigma that accompanies this discourse of Indian benefits. Whether receiving health care, picking up USDA commodities, or living in subsidized Indian housing, Native people experience shame from being treated as if they are receiving a hand-out, not deserved reimbursement. How do I know? Over the past three years, as part of my academic research about issues in Indian Country, I’ve spoken with hundreds of Native folks representing tribes from all over the country. No matter how the conversations begin, an unsolicited discussion about benefits always comes up.

Most of these Native folks express real anger when discussing the normality of non-Indian people thinking that Indians do not pay taxes and receive copious benefits, like free education, housing, healthcare, and profits from casinos. They believe that nonNative people, in general, misunderstand what services are offered and how often people receive them. Comments like “we’re all getting money from the casinos or handouts from the government” are so common. They speak of the humiliation of sitting in clinics or signing up for programs.

Lillie, an indigenous woman pursuing a master’s degree, summed it particularly well, vehemently stating, “I get sick of working with friends or people and they say, ‘Well, at least you get your school paid for.’ Uh, no, I don’t. Then they say, ‘But you get your healthcare free.’ Yeah well, you sit in the clinic all day. See how you like it. It’s a shoddy system. Also, people think we don’t pay taxes. Hey, nobody gave me that memo.”

Framing the obligatory and promised compensation by the U.S. government as merely “benefits” perpetuates the idea of Native dependency, rather than tribal sovereignty. On its most basic level, sovereignty is tribal self-rule. Sovereignty is the one thing that has been successful in breaking the historical socioeconomic dependency of tribes on the U.S. government.

However, the rhetoric of sovereignty itself becomes the stumbling block. After all, if tribes are sovereign nations with self-rule, why does the U.S. have to support and assist them? Why must the good people of the United States continue to support “Indian Benefits” with their hard-earned tax dollars? The American public must be educated that we’re not asking for any favors or charity—just what is owed to us. Nothing more, but certainly, nothing less.

Dwanna L. Robertson is a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, a doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a public sociologist, and an invited speaker. Having grown up in Oklahoma, attending stomps and going to wild onion dinners, she can’t wait to get back west as soon as possible."



Read more:http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ict_sbc/indian-benefits-misnomer-and-propaganda http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/ict_sbc/indian-benefits-misnomer-and-propaganda#ixzz1viNc5wHJ
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 10:41:13 am by walksalone11 »

sigmapi1501

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2012, 11:26:01 am »
I cite: Manifest Destiny and Finders Keepers

falcon9

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2012, 11:55:16 am »
I cite: Manifest Destiny and Finders Keepers

You forgot to cite "dibs", (although that may fall under "finders, keepers" it would depend upon whether you mean 'first' to call dibs or, last).
One can lead a horse to water however, if one holds the horse's head under, that horse will drown.

             

walksalone11

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2012, 11:57:47 am »
I cite: Manifest Destiny and Finders Keepers
....while embracing, of course, the fact that Manifest Destiny has always been a Christian ideology, Finders Keepers is also a concept traditional to only azzholes.

falcon9

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2012, 12:18:36 pm »
I cite: Manifest Destiny and Finders Keepers

....while embracing, of course, the fact that Manifest Destiny has always been a Christian ideology, Finders Keepers is also a concept traditional to only azzholes.

Perhaps so, (in regards to "finders, keepers/dibs"), however that conclusion would logically apply in all applications - including to people who migrated to this continent from another continent before others did the same.  In a related aspect of traditions; the one about land ownership began on continents other than the Americas centuries ago and has only been fairly recently to "native americans", (which, btw, is a misnomer too). 

Historically, those who 'lost' a war had been required to pay reparations to the 'victor', not teh otehr way around.  Citing treaty agreements is all well and good until one looks a bit deeper into which party violated a treaty first.  The first party to violate a contractual agreement, or treaty, nulls and voids that agreement/treaty.  Oddly enough, both signatory parties of treaties in the instance of armistice, (ceasation of hostilities), agreements between the U.S. government and various tribes have violated several of those treaties, (in some instances, the U.S. did so first however, in a great many instances, the signatory tribes did so first).

In the 20th century, the U.S. began a general foreign policy of assistance for those it had defeated in war, (Germany, Japan, various "recognised" tribes).  The whole 'granting of tribal sovereignty' thing is a very recent concept and may be considered legally conflated with a foreign embassy status.
One can lead a horse to water however, if one holds the horse's head under, that horse will drown.

             

walksalone11

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2012, 12:39:40 pm »
I am not aware of any Nations who violated terms of any of the 300+ treaties entered into with the U.S. Especially, not being the first to do so. However, every treaty has been broken by the U.S.

That is, however, not the point of the article. The point being that most people mistake treaty obligations of the U.S. for being welfare. It is not, it is much the same as with any citizens debts, if you stop paying your car, house etc payment, what happens? Would you see your payments of such as welfare benefits that the lending institution is receiving?

falcon9

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2012, 01:03:10 pm »
I am not aware of any Nations who violated terms of any of the 300+ treaties entered into with the U.S. Especially, not being the first to do so. However, every treaty has been broken by the U.S.

I'd discovered several instances of treaty violations by both signatory parties during the course of researching this subject.  For example, the S'Klallam, Skokomish, and Chemakum tribes of the PNW had initially violated the terms of the "Point No Point" treaty of 1855, (by failing to initially meet the terms of that treaty prior to any latter violations of that treaty). There are other similiar examples however, this is somewhat tangential to your point, as you go on to say, (however, I don't concur with that assessment).

That is, however, not the point of the article. The point being that most people mistake treaty obligations of the U.S. for being welfare. It is not, it is much the same as with any citizens debts, if you stop paying your car, house etc payment, what happens? Would you see your payments of such as welfare benefits that the lending institution is receiving?

Since you'd previously mentioned "misnomers", consider combining the two points I'd raised in this regard as they apply to "benefits" and "treaty obligations".  The first point raised was that many, (if not all), of those early treaties were considered to be 'settlement agreements' in that signatory parties to those were agreeing to an exchange, (in the example I used above, the S'Klallam tribe signed the Point No Point treaty which exchanged their agreement to relocate a short distance from the land they occuppied in 1855 and to relinquish Quileute slaves which they were holding after usurping their lands up until that time in exchange for a set of financial and other arrangements ... however, the S'Klallam failed to relocate or relinquish the slaves it held and were thus in initial violation of the Point No Point treaty stipulations). Oddly enough, the S'Klallam, (and other tribes which had initially violated and thus voided treaties they'd signed), went on to lobby that the U.S. government honor the voided treaties' stipulations in regards to receiveing 'reparations' for being the subordinate signatories to those treaties, (that is, they weren't the ones who got to dictate the treaty terms in the first place).
« Last Edit: May 23, 2012, 01:20:58 pm by falcon9 »
One can lead a horse to water however, if one holds the horse's head under, that horse will drown.

             

vickysue

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2012, 04:15:04 pm »
Oh come on how long do we have to support them. Where i live there is 9 res. in our state and everyone of them have gambling and resorts, making dang good money. Some even have oil rights. Now they are wanting to put toll booths on fed. roads that the feds and state built so everyone can get to their sasinos. I have worked for the state and fed. gov. delivering commodities to the resavations and had it thrown back at me because it was not name brand products. It is very good and made by name brand companies just not labled. How long to do we have to keep paying them. They are moochers.

walksalone11

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2012, 11:40:01 am »
Oh come on how long do we have to support them. Where i live there is 9 res. in our state and everyone of them have gambling and resorts, making dang good money. Some even have oil rights. Now they are wanting to put toll booths on fed. roads that the feds and state built so everyone can get to their sasinos. I have worked for the state and fed. gov. delivering commodities to the resavations and had it thrown back at me because it was not name brand products. It is very good and made by name brand companies just not labled. How long to do we have to keep paying them. They are moochers.
Still pissed off that you didn't get that casino job, eh?

There are 9 pueblos in this state. Pueblos are not reservations. There re a couple of reservations here which are home to Apaches and others, but not even close to 9 in number.

The following article shows that the State of New Mexico receives in the neighborhood of $80,000,000.00 per year in taxes from the NDN casinos of the state. Does that sound like the state is getting mooched?

Further evidence that you are speaking out of spiteful vengeance and not knowledge of the subject.

" - While New Mexico’s Indian casinos paid the state nearly $64 million in taxes during the last fiscal year, a state official said it should have been more."
http://www.krqe.com/dpp/news/on_assignment/state-indian-casinos-owe-more-money
« Last Edit: June 03, 2012, 11:42:03 am by walksalone11 »

vickysue

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2012, 03:00:33 pm »
For your information i never applied at a casino for work. I worked for a large dept. store and we met our quota of indians evey time. I had 5 working for me in my dept. What i did apply for was a dental assistance. i had the training . She didn't. I am also part indian. I can trace my many grandfathers back to 1774. can you?

walksalone11

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2012, 10:21:04 am »
For your information i never applied at a casino for work. I worked for a large dept. store and we met our quota of indians evey time. I had 5 working for me in my dept. What i did apply for was a dental assistance. i had the training . She didn't. I am also part indian. I can trace my many grandfathers back to 1774. can you?
Innocent mistake that illustrates my level of concerns for the details.....Part NDN?...which part?  ;)How adorable.....out NDN me eh? LMIAO. Ya mind producing evidence of your generational claim? Yep.....GrandMothers too...on both sides many generations prior to "your" Independence, of course prior to the mid 1800s dates get fuzzy and disappear entirely within a couple of generations. More importantly however....they know who I am as well  ;)

« Last Edit: June 29, 2012, 10:23:39 am by walksalone11 »

falcon9

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2012, 10:34:33 am »
For your information i never applied at a casino for work. I worked for a large dept. store and we met our quota of indians evey time. I had 5 working for me in my dept. What i did apply for was a dental assistance. i had the training . She didn't. I am also part indian. I can trace my many grandfathers back to 1774. can you?

Innocent mistake that illustrates my level of concerns for the details.....Part NDN?...which part?  ;)How adorable.....out NDN me eh? LMIAO. Ya mind producing evidence of your generational claim? Yep.....GrandMothers too...on both sides many generations prior to "your" Independence, of course prior to the mid 1800s dates get fuzzy and disappear entirely within a couple of generations. More importantly however....they know who I am as well  ;)



Heh.  That's just shy of the ye olde "Cherokee Princess" claim, no? 
Walks, where have you been, bud?
One can lead a horse to water however, if one holds the horse's head under, that horse will drown.

             

walksalone11

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #12 on: June 29, 2012, 10:38:56 am »
For your information i never applied at a casino for work. I worked for a large dept. store and we met our quota of indians evey time. I had 5 working for me in my dept. What i did apply for was a dental assistance. i had the training . She didn't. I am also part indian. I can trace my many grandfathers back to 1774. can you?

Innocent mistake that illustrates my level of concerns for the details.....Part NDN?...which part?  ;)How adorable.....out NDN me eh? LMIAO. Ya mind producing evidence of your generational claim? Yep.....GrandMothers too...on both sides many generations prior to "your" Independence, of course prior to the mid 1800s dates get fuzzy and disappear entirely within a couple of generations. More importantly however....they know who I am as well  ;)



Heh.  That's just shy of the ye olde "Cherokee Princess" claim, no? 
Walks, where have you been, bud?
Ummm.....I got a bit busy for a minute.....
I see not much has changed....was looking thru some other threads and can't seem to find any thing to make a facetious comment about that wouldnt simply be a re-run of one of my old ones. I'll keep looking tho....maybe I'll find something besides letting the newbies know that they will need more than just one post to get their three bucks....

falcon9

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #13 on: June 29, 2012, 10:45:25 am »
Ummm.....I got a bit busy for a minute.....

That can happen.

I see not much has changed....was looking thru some other threads and can't seem to find any thing to make a facetious comment about that wouldnt simply be a re-run of one of my old ones. I'll keep looking tho....maybe I'll find something besides letting the newbies know that they will need more than just one post to get their three bucks....

Doubtless, 'the more things change, the more they stay much the same.'  You did miss the Post Mania contest though, (which was a bit different than noobs asking already-answered questions or, xtians proselytizing and becoming incensed when called on it).
One can lead a horse to water however, if one holds the horse's head under, that horse will drown.

             

walksalone11

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Re: Indian Benefits: Misnomer and Propaganda
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2012, 10:54:34 am »
Ummm.....I got a bit busy for a minute.....

That can happen.

I see not much has changed....was looking thru some other threads and can't seem to find any thing to make a facetious comment about that wouldnt simply be a re-run of one of my old ones. I'll keep looking tho....maybe I'll find something besides letting the newbies know that they will need more than just one post to get their three bucks....

Doubtless, 'the more things change, the more they stay much the same.'  You did miss the Post Mania contest though, (which was a bit different than noobs asking already-answered questions or, xtians proselytizing and becoming incensed when called on it).

Post Mania?


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